I’m Moving!

If you’ve wondered why it’s been so quiet here on Bloombakecreate, it’s because I’m moving. I also took a short vacation to Washington State before embarking on this change.

Photo by Michael Jasmund on Unsplash

No, I’m not physically moving, just moving my website to a new host and changing the name.

My new website is lyndaheines.blog. If you subscribe with Mailchimp you will be automatically redirected. And I will forward this site to the other blog for awhile. I’m in my final tweaking of the website, which I hope to have completed by the end of the week.

Talking about changes, we picked up this leaf on our morning walk. It’s still hot here, but I do believe Fall is coming. After this hot summer, I’m looking forward to some cooler temps.

And while I’m slaving away over the new website, Puddin is doing her usual!

That’s all for now. See you soon from lyndaheines.blog.

 

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Manhole Printing

I’m sure my husband thought I had lost it the other day when I headed out to try manhole printing.

I saw this You Tube video about this process and just had to try it.

I’ve always been interested in manhole covers. Here is a picture of one I took when we were in Honolulu.

When I saw that video, I had to try manhole printing. I found one that was just down the street, in the grass, and right next to the school parking lot. This is important because I needed to be close to carry all of the stuff from my car to the manhole. I also needed to be away from traffic.

Here are the supplies needed:

  • fabric
  • small paint roller
  • acrylic sheet (or really any piece of plastic or a paint tray)
  • screen printing ink – water soluble
  • plastic spoons
  • bucket of water
  • towels/rags
  • brayer

It had rained hard the night before so I knew the manhole wouldn’t be real dirty. I used one of my towels to clean and dry it off before adding the ink. Then I spooned the ink on the acrylic sheet and rolled the paint roller in it.

Next I rolled the paint over the manhole cover. I did this several times hoping to get a good print.

Then I placed the fabric over the manhole cover, and smoothed the fabric with my hand. The next time I’ll use a brayer. That would make this much easier and would result in a better print.

I lifted the fabric and put it out in the sun to dry.

While they were drying, I took the bucket of water and poured it over the cover. With one of my towels I wiped all of the paint off. I packed up the car and headed home.

I allowed the fabric to dry overnight and then ironed them on the wrong side to heat set.

Here are my results.

I chose previously dyed fabric. You, of course, could use white fabric, t-shirts, tote bags, or any fabric you want to print. I thought for this first try I’d use these old fabrics I’ve had in my studio for years.

If you decide to do this, make sure you are safe. Don’t try this on a street unless you are sure there will be no traffic. Also, use water soluble screen printing inks so you don’t leave any permanent color. Lastly, leave no mess behind.

Now to look for some different manhole covers to add to the collection. I spotted one on a walkway that might work. More to come!

I’m linking up today with Off the Wall Friday. Check out the link for some inspiration.

 

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It’s time to preserve botanicals

It’s time to preserve botanicals for art play this winter.

One of the reasons I preserve leaves and flowers is so I can use them before they come alive. One spring several years ago I wanted to sun print ferns, but I couldn’t since the ferns were not growing yet. So now I preserve the botanicals while they are alive, and then I can use them all year. My first post on preserving was in 2014.

The recipe to preserve is simple. All you need is glycerin and hot water. Mix 1 part glycerin in 2 parts of hot water. Add your botanicals one-by-one, making sure every part of the plant is covered. Let them stay in the solution for several days. Then remove them and place on paper towels.

Place paper towel over botanical and blot.

Continue this process, stacking the botanicals.

Once you are finished you’ll have a stack like this.

I let these sit for a couple days to make sure they are dry, and then placed in containers paper towels and all.

Once they are preserved, they can be used over and over. These are ones from 2014 that I’m still using.

Now for a few ways to used these preserved botanicals. Links are to posts about the techniques.

Here I used them with gelatin plates.

Leaf printing

Printing using Solarfast

Sun printing posts here.

sun printed fabric using setacolorsSo if you’re wanting to botanicals to print all year, now is the time to preserve them.

 

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Spinner Art using a Turntable

Let’s now change gears a bit and make spinner art using a turntable.

Just a reminder, all of the fabric has been soaked in soda ash water for 15 minutes and allowed to dry before adding the resists and dyes.

My friend Connie gave me this turntable for my spinner art. I experimented a bit with it back in 2015 and wrote this post. I’ve not used it since then, but I was having so much fun with my Hasbro Spinner, I thought I’d add it into the play.

turn tableBecause it doesn’t spin very fast, you don’t get the splatter.  I put pieces of rolled up painter’s tape on the turntable and added the fabric.  You can’t tape it completely flat because of the center. I tried to remove the spindle, but couldn’t do it without taking the whole player apart.

Then I used the techniques from the other spinner art pieces. For information on those techniques, please refer to my previous posts. Here is a link to all of them.

I really love the results, and I get a much larger piece of fabric – approximately 11 x 11 inches. So here are my results:

Soy wax with Thickened Dyes

Glue Resist and Spray Dyed

Jacquard Resist and Thickened Dyes

This last piece has a lot of blobs. When I do this again, I’ll be more careful when adding the resist.

Well, that’s the end of this series. Here are all of my pieces from this spinner art series.

Now to use these lovely pieces. In my first little quilt piece, I used one of my ice dyed fat quarter and a turntable spinner. I still need to add the binding.

I do see a series of these little spinner art quilts in my future.  Here is a link to all of the Spinner Art tutorials. Thanks for dropping by.

I’m linking up today with Off the Wall Friday. Check out the link for some inspiration.

 

 

Posted in dyeing, Fabric Resists, fiber reactive dyes, glue resist, soy wax, spin-art, spinner art, tutorials | Tagged , , , , , , , | 6 Comments

Spinner Art with Soy Wax and Thickened Dye

I absolutely love playing with soy wax. Today we’re talking about using the Hasbro Spin-Art machine with soy wax and thickened dye. Check out my previous post about how to  make the thickened dye.

Just a reminder, all of the fabric has been soaked in soda ash water for 15 minutes and allowed to dry before adding the soy wax and dyes.

I must admit that these are the least favorite of my spinner art pieces. Before I show you how I made them, here are a couple of pieces I also dyed not using the machine.

But let’s get back to the spinner. If you aren’t familiar with soy wax, check out my post on the basics of soy wax batik.

Once the wax is melted, I dipped a brush in the wax and added it to my fabric in the machine.

Once it is dry, which doesn’t take long, paint with the thickened dye.

Set the fabric aside and let dry.

One of the things I do differently when playing with soy wax is I designate a couple containers just for washout. I mark them and put them with my soy wax supplies.

The wax is really hard to get completely out of the container, so having these special containers helps with the cleanup.

I let the fabric batch overnight. Then it was time to rinse with cold water until the water turns clear. Getting the wax off is a challenge, but not as difficult as the glue. After the wax was gone, I rinsed in hot water, and let the fabric sit in hot soapy water for 30 minutes. Then they were off to in the washer for a hot wash, and two rinses. After drying them on high heat, I ironed them.

And the finished pieces again. Because I’m adding the wax with a brush, I don’t get the splatters like I got with the other resists.

As I mentioned earlier, I wasn’t really impressed with these. Maybe using a smaller brush would have worked better.

We’re almost finished with this series and I will move on. Thanks for stopping by. To check out my other Spinner Art posts, check out this link.

 

 

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Spinner Art with Color Magnet

Today I’m on to using my spinner with Jacquard Color Magnet. If you are not familiar with it, it’s a great product that when you use one color dye, you get two-tone fabric. Where the Color Magnet is, the color should be darker than the background. However, that is not always the case. In the past I’ve spent quite a bit of time experimenting with CM and found that colors like red will strike faster and so the background sometimes will be darker or as dark as the area with CM. Check out my post on this product.

Just a reminder, all of the fabric has been soaked in soda ash water for 15 minutes and allowed to dry before adding the CM.

I added the Color Magnet to one of those small bottles and turned on the spinner.

Then the finished piece.

What’s good about Color Magnet is that you can see where it is as it shows up yellow.

Allow it to dry. Then I spray dyed it. To read about spray dyeing, check out this previous post.

I let the fabric batch overnight. Then it was time to rinse with cold water. By the time the fabric is rinsed in the cold water and the water has run clear, the Color Magnet is gone.  I then rinsed in hot water, and let the fabric sit in hot soapy water. Then they were off to in the washer for a hot wash, and two rinses. After drying them on high heat, I ironed them.

And the finished pieces again.

I absolutely love the way these turned out. They are probably my favorite.

To see my other spinner art tutorials, check out this link.   Check out this link to be inspired by other fiber artists:  Nina-Marie’s Off The Wall Friday,

Just a couple more posts on the spinner art.

 

Posted in dyeing, Fabric Resists, fiber reactive dyes, Jacquard Color Magnet, spin-art, spinner art, tutorials | Tagged , , , , , , , | 8 Comments

Spinner Art with Jacquard Water Based Resist

For this post I’m using Jacquard Water Based Resist with my spinner art. I really like using this product and unlike glue it is so easy to wash out of the fabric. You can see me use this resist on silk in this post.

Just a reminder, all of the fabric has been soaked in soda ash water for 15 minutes and allowed to dry before adding the Jacquard Resist and dyes.

I put the Jacquard Resist in a small bottle and away we went.

When the resist was dry, using a foam brush I painted the fabric with the thickened dye. In this post I show how to make thickened dye.

 

I let the fabric batch overnight. Then fabrics are rinsed in cold water until the water runs clear. It doesn’t take long for the resist to wash out.  I continue to rinse in warm water increasing it to hot. Then they soak in a hot bath of water and Blue Dawn detergent for around 30 minutes. Then it’s off to the washer in hot water with two rinses, the dryer, and a nice press with the iron.

Here are the final pieces again.

These are some of my favorites so far. If you have missed my other posts about Spinner Art, check out this link. I have just a couple more spinner art posts, and then I’ll move on to something else. It’s been fun focusing on one technique.

 

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Spinner Art with Glue and Spray Dye

In the first of the Spinner Art series I used glue as a resist and low immersion dyed. In this post I’m talking about using the glue, but spraying the dye on the fabric.

Just a reminder, all of the fabric has been soaked in soda ash water for 15 minutes and allowed to dry before adding the glue and the dyes.

Once the glue was dry it was time to make dye water. I added approximately 1 teaspoon of dye per 1 cup of water.

I loved how the sticks turned out.

I used one part of a table as the spraying area. That’s important when spraying since the dye will drift everywhere.

Then after each piece was done, it was moved to another area to dry. I cleaned up the area for the next piece to be sprayed.

Here are the pieces done and drying.

I let the fabric batch overnight. Then it was time to rinse with cold water. Getting the glue off is a challenge, but it just takes time. After most of the glue was gone, I rinsed in hot water, and let the fabric sit in hot soapy water. Then they were off to in the washer for a hot wash, and two rinses. After drying them on high heat, I ironed them.

And the finished pieces again.

I wanted to compare the two glue resist pieces. Here they are side by side. On the left are the spray dyed pieces. On the right are the low immersion pieces.

The low immersion pieces are darker, but the resist is faint because while it’s sitting in the water, the dye is getting under the glue. And instead of the white, we are not getting as much resist. However, the sprayed pieces are lighter. Another option would be to use thickened dye.

So that’s all about using the glue resist. It’s cheap and easy to use, but hard to get out of the fabric. It’s best to either spray or paint on the dye, since it is water soluble. I much rather use Jacquard Water Based Resist that I’ll be writing about in my next post.

 

Posted in dyeing, fiber reactive dyes, glue resist, spin-art, spinner art, tutorials | Tagged , , , , | 11 Comments

Spinner Art with Thickened Dye

In my last post I showed spinner art with glue as a resist and low immersion dyeing once the glue was dry. In this post, we are going to use the dye in the spinner without a resist.

I decided, for this project and the future ones I’ll be showing you, that I would go ahead and soda ash soak the fabric ahead of time. After soaking for 15 or so minutes, I hung it to dry. Once dry it can be used. This will save me from adding the soda ash to the dye water. I ironed the first set with a warm iron. However, in my later dyeing I didn’t even bother with the iron, just smoothed them as best as I could.

I am using thickened dye. There are a variety of ways to make thickened dye. I make the Chemical Water first by mixing in one quart of water, 1/2 cup of Urea, and 2 teaspoons of Ludigol.  I double the amounts and pour into a gallon water container. To make the print paste I take out a quart of Chemical Water and mix in the blender with 2 tablespoons of Sodium Alginate. This paste is put in a quart jar. Then I need to wait several hours for the print paste to set up. When it’s ready, I pour some out into my plastic containers.

Then I add the tablespoon of dye and mix. I add more print paste after mixing to end with a cup of thickened dye.

Here are the thickened dyes waiting to be used.

I added the thickened dye to small bottles and the fun began.

Here is what one of the pieces using blue and yellow looked like when finished.

After 24 hours, they are rinsed in cold water until it run clear. I continue to rinse in warm water increasing it to hot. Then they soak in a hot bath of water and Blue Dawn detergent for around 30 minutes. Then it’s off to the washer in hot water with two rinses, the dryer, and a nice press with the iron.

And the finished pieces again.

Using the thickened dye in the spinner really makes a mess of the machine. In order to keep each piece from not getting the previous dye color, I had to wipe it out. Just something to consider if you decide to do that.

This has been so much fun, but as mentioned above, there is more! And until my next post, check out what others are creating at Off The Wall Friday.

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Spinner Art Revisited

In 2012 I wrote an article on Spinner Art for the June/July issue of Quilting Arts magazine. I also wrote a blog post Here and recorded a video using Sharpies Here.

I decided that I wanted to revisit this technique, but use dyes instead of paints or Sharpies. I also wanted to use glue as a resist.

I started with white fabric. You can either soak the fabric in soda ash ahead of time, let dry and then put in the spinner, or skip the soda ash step and add the soda ash to dye water. Since I didn’t want to take the time to soak the fabric, I added the soda ash to the dye water.

The area in the spinner is only large enough for 6 x 6 inch fabric. I attached it with a piece of painter’s tape.

Next I turn on the spinner and add the glue. You can stop and look at the fabric anytime. Then either start again, or take it out of the machine and set on plastic to dry.

This is what the fabric will look like.

Now we need to wait for the glue to dry. I just let it dry overnight. Then it’s on to dyeing.

I mixed up ten colors since I had 10 6-inch squares of fabric – 1 tablespoon of dye per cup of warm water. The amount of dye is really flexible and I could have used less, but I wanted dark colors. I added the fabric and then added the cup of soda ash water (1 teaspoon per cup of warm water). I let the fabric batch for a couple hours.

Then it’s time to rinse with cold water. Getting the glue off is a challenge, but it just takes time. After most of the glue was gone, I rinsed in hot water, and let the fabric sit in hot soapy water. Then they were off to in the washer for a hot wash, and two rinses. After drying them on high heat, I ironed them.

Here is a picture of them again.

Since there was room in the containers, I added additional pieces of fabric from a recent failed experiment! The blues didn’t turn out very dark. Had I batched them longer I would have gotten dark colors.

But WAIT! I’m not done with my spinner. I’ll be showing  you more of my spinner art in the coming week. So much fun to get back into the dye studio.

Meanwhile, Puddin sure does miss Ace. She’s been laying in areas he always laid in including this “punch bowl” which she never cared for. She also has been crying in the early  morning, but I see her adjust a little bit everyday, as we are.

 

Posted in dyeing, fiber reactive dyes, glue resist, low immersion, spin-art, spinner art, tutorials | Tagged , , , , , , | 7 Comments